Statute of Frauds

Olson v. The Curators of the University of Missouri

Loreen Olson brought an action alleging breach of contract and related claims, in which she asserted that the Dean of the College of Arts and Sciences had offered her the job as chair of the Communications Department at a meeting, and she had accepted. The dean then sent Olson two offer letters, one for a three-year contract period and the other for the preceding two-month period. When Olson emailed the dean about other terms of employment — which she claimed had been discussed at the meeting — the dean instructed his assistant to email Olson to inform her that the dean would be contacting the faculty to select another chair due to irreconcilable differences. The Missouri Court of Appeals, Western District reversed the trial court’s grant of partial summary judgment in favor the university and remanded the case to the trial court, because the undisputed facts didn’t negate Olson’s contention that a contract had been formed during her meeting with the dean.
[click to continue…]

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Post on Twitter

{ 0 comments }

Are contracts made via email enforceable? You betcha—although not in all cases.

In this recent post I highlighted a case where a written contract was modified by a pithy instant message exchange, and in this post I discussed a case where a court enforced “browsewrap” terms of use for a free website where the user had not read the terms. Today I’ll discuss a cyberspace contracting case where an email exchange formed a binding contract. [click to continue…]

Digg This
Reddit This
Stumble Now!
Share on Facebook
Bookmark this on Delicious
Share on LinkedIn
Post on Twitter

{ 2 comments }