UCC section 2-207

A tremendous amount of business is conducted via purchase orders without signed contracts. Overall, this is good for commerce because business doesn’t have to screech to a halt every time a company needs to buy something, to give the lawyers time to work out the legal terms. But if there’s no signed contract, how do you know when a contract has been formed, and how do you know what the terms of the contract are?

These are million-dollar questions that are very difficult to answer and which are often litigated. In fact, it’s impossible to know the answers until after the fact because they depend on the specific facts and circumstances of each individual transaction.

[click to continue…]

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In this recent post I discussed some habits that businesses can adopt to increase their contract hygiene. These practices, which can improve a business’s health, are inexpensive and effective, yet often neglected.

To recap, the first three habits are:

  1. Negotiate before you sign.
  2. Give important contracts special attention.
  3. Don’t sign the other side’s boilerplate terms and conditions. [click to continue…]
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Can You Win the Battle of the Forms?

by Brian Rogers on March 8, 2011

in Battle of the Forms

I’ve long thought that the “battle of the forms” is easy to lose but impossible to win. That’s the perspective of a commercial attorney who approaches the issue from the front end—where the battlefield consists solely of varied hypothetical future situations. A litigator on one side or the other, of course, wins each battle that goes to trial.

The battle of the forms refers to the common practice of doing business via purchase and sale documents containing “small print” boilerplate and the interaction of each party’s boilerplate in determining the actual contract terms. [click to continue…]

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“As few as 50% of restaurant workers wash their hands.” I was introduced to that disturbing stat during a presentation about some sort of high-tech handwashing tracking device that could monitor which employees were washing their hands. I’m not sure whether it was mounted to the sink or the soap dispenser or exactly how it worked—I was a bit distracted by the thought that the folks who worked at my favorite restaurants might be on the wrong half of the curve.

This had an oddly familiar ring to it. A simple practice, inexpensive, effective. Yet often neglected. Just like the contracting practices of a lot of businesses. [click to continue…]

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